Nursing: Drug Abuse Crisis for West Virginia Nurses (2021 Update)

22.95
Online
Mandatory
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course

Deaths from drug use continue to contribute to mortality in the United States. Over the past 20 years, the severity of drug abuse and drug overdose deaths has been steadily increasing. In 2018, West Virginia was the state with the highest age-adjusted drug overdose death rate: 51.5 drug overdose deaths per 100,000 people (CDC, 2020). Despite individual and federal efforts to curb drug abuse, nurses care for patients who have drug problems every day. This course is designed to satisfy the West Virginia nursing continuing education requirement on the topic of substance abuse. The course presents information to help nurses in understanding an addict’s problems and provides strategies to help nurses manage those problems.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe the costs associated with substance abuse, including its psychosocial impact on children and their school performance.
  • Review the most common street drugs, including their street names and health impacts.
  • Explain how to use naloxone to reverse an opioid overdose, and the dos and don’ts of opioid overdose management.
  • Differentiate between the three most frequently abused prescription drug types and provides examples of each type.
  • Discuss the new emerging drugs of abuse.
  • Describe the management of patients abusing street drugs as well as methods to ensure safe and effective controlled substance use.

Author the Author:
Katie Blair, PharmD, RPh

Katie Blair, PharmD, RPh, is a pharmacist and freelance writer specializing in pharmacy education. She works as a consultant pharmacist in Vancouver, Washington, serving long-term care facilities in the area since 2016 and has over 6 years of experience working as a staff pharmacist at a community pharmacy in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Blair graduated from Northeastern University in Boston in 2009 with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. She has done freelance work writing and revising continuing education programs for pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses, as well as writing practice questions for various pharmacy technician exams.
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Drug Abuse Crisis for West Virginia Nurses (2021 Update) - N47811

22.95
About the Course

Deaths from drug use continue to contribute to mortality in the United States. Over the past 20 years, the severity of drug abuse and drug overdose deaths has been steadily increasing. In 2018, West Virginia was the state with the highest age-adjusted drug overdose death rate: 51.5 drug overdose deaths per 100,000 people (CDC, 2020). Despite individual and federal efforts to curb drug abuse, nurses care for patients who have drug problems every day. This course is designed to satisfy the West Virginia nursing continuing education requirement on the topic of substance abuse. The course presents information to help nurses in understanding an addict’s problems and provides strategies to help nurses manage those problems.

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe the costs associated with substance abuse, including its psychosocial impact on children and their school performance.
  • Review the most common street drugs, including their street names and health impacts.
  • Explain how to use naloxone to reverse an opioid overdose, and the dos and don’ts of opioid overdose management.
  • Differentiate between the three most frequently abused prescription drug types and provides examples of each type.
  • Discuss the new emerging drugs of abuse.
  • Describe the management of patients abusing street drugs as well as methods to ensure safe and effective controlled substance use.

Author the Author:
Katie Blair, PharmD, RPh

Katie Blair, PharmD, RPh, is a pharmacist and freelance writer specializing in pharmacy education. She works as a consultant pharmacist in Vancouver, Washington, serving long-term care facilities in the area since 2016 and has over 6 years of experience working as a staff pharmacist at a community pharmacy in Seattle, Washington. Dr. Blair graduated from Northeastern University in Boston in 2009 with a Doctor of Pharmacy degree. She has done freelance work writing and revising continuing education programs for pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and nurses, as well as writing practice questions for various pharmacy technician exams.