Nursing: Pain Management and Opioid Use for New Jersey Nurses

11.95
Online
Mandatory
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course

According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), most American adults experience some degree of pain. It is critical that all nurses have an understanding of pain management and the potential risks and benefits of using opioid pain medication for its treatment. This course provides all nurses engaged in practice settings in the state of New Jersey that prescribe opioids with an accredited 1-contact hour course that discusses the risks and signs of opioid misuse, addiction, and diversion (New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, 2020). The course, designed to satisfy the continuing education requirement for licensure renewal, focuses on the use of prescription opioid drugs and potential alternative medications useful for the treatment and management of pain. 

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • State the required frequency of controlled substance inventories.
  • Provide an overview of controlled substance recordkeeping.
  • Explain the concept of a controlled substance closed system.
  • Identify two traits sometimes associated with drug diversion by a healthcare professional.
  • Provide an example of an action required by an institution following the identification of employee diversion.
  • Suggest one potential benefit that may arise from the identification of institutional diversion.
  • Describe a negative consequence associated with the improper disposal of controlled substances.
  • Note one key step in the treatment of addiction.
  • Name a medication useful in the treatment of opioid overdose.

About the Author:
Bradley Gillespie, PharmD
 
Trained as a clinical pharmacist, Dr. Gillespie has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 25+ years. His initial role was as a clinical pharmacology and biopharmaceutics reviewer at U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), followed by 20 years of leading early development programs in the pharma/biotech/ nutritional industries. In addition to his industrial focus, he remains a registered pharmacist and enjoys mentoring drug development scientists and health professionals, leading workshops, and developing continuing education programs for pharmacists, nurses, and other medical professionals.
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Pain Management and Opioid Use for New Jersey Nurses - N48012

11.95
About the Course

According to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), most American adults experience some degree of pain. It is critical that all nurses have an understanding of pain management and the potential risks and benefits of using opioid pain medication for its treatment. This course provides all nurses engaged in practice settings in the state of New Jersey that prescribe opioids with an accredited 1-contact hour course that discusses the risks and signs of opioid misuse, addiction, and diversion (New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, 2020). The course, designed to satisfy the continuing education requirement for licensure renewal, focuses on the use of prescription opioid drugs and potential alternative medications useful for the treatment and management of pain. 

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • State the required frequency of controlled substance inventories.
  • Provide an overview of controlled substance recordkeeping.
  • Explain the concept of a controlled substance closed system.
  • Identify two traits sometimes associated with drug diversion by a healthcare professional.
  • Provide an example of an action required by an institution following the identification of employee diversion.
  • Suggest one potential benefit that may arise from the identification of institutional diversion.
  • Describe a negative consequence associated with the improper disposal of controlled substances.
  • Note one key step in the treatment of addiction.
  • Name a medication useful in the treatment of opioid overdose.

About the Author:
Bradley Gillespie, PharmD
 
Trained as a clinical pharmacist, Dr. Gillespie has practiced in an industrial setting for the past 25+ years. His initial role was as a clinical pharmacology and biopharmaceutics reviewer at U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), followed by 20 years of leading early development programs in the pharma/biotech/ nutritional industries. In addition to his industrial focus, he remains a registered pharmacist and enjoys mentoring drug development scientists and health professionals, leading workshops, and developing continuing education programs for pharmacists, nurses, and other medical professionals.